Adding a Static Route to a Windows Computer

Command (executed from Windows Command Prompt "Run as Administrator")

route add [destination network] mask [netmask] [switch ip] metric 2

Example (J+P Subnet=192.168.100.0 /24, Switch IP: 192.168.0.254)

route add 192.168.100.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.254 metric 2

Example Command Prompt

When troubleshooting a system, there are some situations where adding a static route to the computer's internal routing table is necessary:

1) If there is not a static route already added to the network router. Perhaps because one is not needed for the day-to-day operation of the system (switching only) or the router does not support adding a static route.

2) Changing the computer's default gateway to the switch IP would conflict with the ability to connect the computer to the internet for Remote Desktop Support.

3) The installer has to connect to the internet using the WiFi connection, while hard wiring into the Just Add Power system in situations where the Just Add Power switch is not connected to the rest of the customer's network.

For situation number 1, there are installations that do not use any of the advanced features in the Just Add Power devices, and use switching only. There are also systems that use routers which do not support adding a static route (such as an Apple router), or they may be in a commercial system where they had to change their control system processor default gateway to be the switch's IP versus having the IT department add a static route to their network. In any of these scenarios, it will be easiest to simply add a static route to the computer to gain access to the Just Add Power devices, versus trying to wrangle with getting a static route added to the network. The goal is to make it as easy on the installer as possible, and in many cases this can be done with one simple line of code.

In situation number 2, the computer may be connected to the existing network, but changing the computer's default gateway to the switch IP would prevent a technician from being able to gain remote access into the system for enhanced support. In these situations, simply add the static route to the computer if part of the troubleshooting requires access to the Just Add Power devices.

In situation number 3, we do not want to set the wired network adapter's default gateway, as this will cause the computer to be confused about where the internet actually is; is it on the wireless connection's default gateway, or the wired connection where the switch is at? Multiple default gateway's cause grief, and adding a static route to the computer to teach it to go out the wired connection circumvents this limitation.

While adding a static route to a computer can be a great troubleshooting tool, it will not enhance the actual operation of the system as the static route is only tied to the computer that the route is applied to. This method should not serve as a replacement for adding a static route to a system to access advanced features, but will provide a troubleshooting tool in the situations listed above.